You’ve Probably Never Heard Of It, But This Coffee Trend From the ’50s is Still Thriving Today

Good conversations, your closest friends and a cup of coffee will never go out of style.

Fun by dessertPhoto: Shutterstock / Pressmaster

Growing up, I heard my grandma use the term “coffee klatch” all the time. “When my girls were young, I used to coffee-klatch with the other moms in the neighborhood.” Or, “I’m meeting my friends at the diner for a coffee klatch.” They’d get together for a cup of joe and something to eat, like coffee cake. It was an old-school term that I associated with my grandma, and I thought it was a pastime that ceased to exist these days.

Origin of the Coffee Klatch

The term “coffee klatch” comes from the German word, “kaffeeklatsch,” which translates to coffee (kaffee) + gossip (klatsch). It refers to a group of friends getting together over a cup of coffee, usually at someone’s house. The word “klatsch” has turned into “klatch” or even “clatch” over the years, and both are considered acceptable to use.

Coffee klatches were popular in the 1950s, when it was common for women to stay home with the kids. Ladies would get together with neighbors, discussing the latest updates in everyone’s lives. There would usually be something to munch on, too, like cookies to dunk in your coffee. It was a great way to spend a morning.

The Modern Day Coffee Klatch

Coffee klatches still exist today, though the term has become almost extinct. Since more women have careers now, they don’t meet up with friends on, say, a Tuesday morning. They do, however, get together for coffee. Whether it’s at a Starbucks (did you know how Starbucks got its name?) or the cute coffee shop in town, many women have kept this tradition alive.

Relaxing in a cozy coffee house, catching up with dear friends and sipping on one of the finest coffee shop drinks—what could be better than that?

Coffee klatch with these coffee cakes.
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Emily Racette Parulski
Emily Racette Parulski is a Senior Editor for Taste of Home, specializing in email newsletters. When she’s not writing about food, she’s baking something sweet to feed her chocolate obsession.