Upper Peninsula Pasties Recipe

4.5 27 26
Upper Peninsula Pasties Recipe
Upper Peninsula Pasties Recipe photo by Taste of Home
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Upper Peninsula Pasties Recipe

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4.5 27 26
Publisher Photo
Meet the Cook: I grew up in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, where many people are of English ancestry and pasties - traditional meat pies often eaten by hand - are popular. Home is now a bush community. My husband and I have four children. -Carole Lynn Derifield, Valdez, Alaska
MAKES:
12 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 35 min. + chilling Bake: 1 hour
MAKES:
12 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 35 min. + chilling Bake: 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 2 cups shortening
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 5-1/2 to 6 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • FILLING:
  • 12 large red potatoes (about 6 pounds), peeled
  • 4 medium rutabagas (about 3 pounds), peeled
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine
  • Half-and-half cream, optional

Directions

In a large bowl, stir shortening and water until shortening is melted. Gradually stir in flour and salt until a very soft dough is formed; cover and refrigerate for 1-1/2 hours.
Quarter and thinly slice potatoes and rutabagas; place in a large bowl with onions, beef, pork and seasonings. Divide dough into 12 equal portions. On a floured surface,roll out one portion at a time into a 10-in. circle. Mound about 2 cups filling on half of each circle; dot with 1 teaspoon butter. Moisten edges with water; fold dough over filling and press edges with a fork to seal. Place on ungreased baking sheets. Cut several slits in top of pasties. Brush with cream if desired. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks. Serve hot or cold. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 12 servings.
Originally published as Upper Peninsula Pasties in Country Woman September/October 1996, p29

Nutritional Facts

1 each: 950 calories, 49g fat (16g saturated fat), 72mg cholesterol, 1130mg sodium, 92g carbohydrate (11g sugars, 9g fiber), 32g protein.

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  • 2 cups shortening
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 5-1/2 to 6 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • FILLING:
  • 12 large red potatoes (about 6 pounds), peeled
  • 4 medium rutabagas (about 3 pounds), peeled
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1/4 cup butter or margarine
  • Half-and-half cream, optional
  1. In a large bowl, stir shortening and water until shortening is melted. Gradually stir in flour and salt until a very soft dough is formed; cover and refrigerate for 1-1/2 hours.
  2. Quarter and thinly slice potatoes and rutabagas; place in a large bowl with onions, beef, pork and seasonings. Divide dough into 12 equal portions. On a floured surface,roll out one portion at a time into a 10-in. circle. Mound about 2 cups filling on half of each circle; dot with 1 teaspoon butter. Moisten edges with water; fold dough over filling and press edges with a fork to seal. Place on ungreased baking sheets. Cut several slits in top of pasties. Brush with cream if desired. Bake at 350° for 1 hour or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks. Serve hot or cold. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 12 servings.
Originally published as Upper Peninsula Pasties in Country Woman September/October 1996, p29

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Reviews forUpper Peninsula Pasties

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MY REVIEW
GammyD User ID: 1675696 284079
Reviewed Feb. 21, 2018

"Did it ever occur to anyone that taste of home made some changes to my recipe? I never use cream either geeze bunch of critics. I've never put anything on my crust. I also had in my recipe where i used chopped beef and pork that I did myself which they omitted as well. I don't like carrots in mine so why add them? Also yes I can use all the filling gotta roll that crust thin. If you can't I don't know make another batch of crust. Simple as that. They freeze great. Then you'll have available when you get the craving. I make about 40 at a time. I don't know bout most but we all cook different to our own liking. I learned from the best my Finnish gramma, my mom and other gram both neither cornish or Finn. I was born and raised in Hancock and I've eaten many. I make mine a combo of all 3 how they make theirs because that's how "i" like them! I hate lard it's old fashioned and would never use in this day and age. Don't nitpick using red potato until you try it with some garlic powder flavoring along with alot of salt and pepper is how "i" like my pasties. Ird not garlicky I add enough to add some more flavor cuz I love garlic! I'm sure all the miners wives back in the day used whatever potato and meat, etc. they had. Not many choices and poor. Just an FYI from this Yooper who makes it her way but it's still very much a yooper tradition! I

don't think i've ever had any two pasties that were the alike in the Yoop and I've enjoyed most except the ones made with heavy old lard! Thanks to those who have an open mind ??"

MY REVIEW
Todd User ID: 9411716 282399
Reviewed Jan. 21, 2018

"I'm making these tomorrow. Recipe sounds authentic. I'm curious though, what is creating such a high carb count on these? 92 seems like an awful lot for a 10" diameter piece of dough, with a few cubed potatoes. I'm diabetic, so I suppose I can cut it down to an 8" diameter, and take out some of the taters to whittle down the carb count."

MY REVIEW
peanutsnona76 User ID: 8027573 277015
Reviewed Oct. 30, 2017

"Oh beloved pasties! Grew up a Yooper. As stated by others, they are Cornish, adopted by the Finnish, English, Croatian-even Italian miners of the U.P. The ultimate U.P. comfort food! All of our Grandmas' recipes are the best, yes? This recipe is not close to mine-except for the firm crust using boiling water. Makes the crust firm enough to make perfectly portable pasty. Russet potatoes, no garlic, no cream. (Cream was not something a poor miner's family would use in an everyday lunch.) Double the crust and make more, smaller pasties. Not a true U.P. old-time recipe."

MY REVIEW
heather5278 User ID: 8269847 264637
Reviewed Apr. 13, 2017

"The dough recipe is good, but this is waaaay too much filling for 12 pasties. I made another half batch of dough for a total of 18 pasties and it was still too much filling. Got annoyed and threw the rest of the filling in a baking dish with a sheet of puff pastry on top. Next time will start with 2 lbs of meat and 2 lbs of potatoes and see what happens."

MY REVIEW
kping User ID: 7157325 263788
Reviewed Mar. 23, 2017

"I am originally from the UP too. I make these every so often. I have not made this recipe but close to what I make. I use round steak instead of hamburger. Just a helpful hint . . . use a cover of a pot to cut out the dough for pasty like a cookie cutter."

MY REVIEW
sugarcrystal User ID: 5836839 247757
Reviewed May. 1, 2016

"Great recipe. I grew up eating pasties, & every family has their own take on how they should be made...apparently some people on here believe their way is the only way. I believe that the pasty was invented to use up leftovers, or whatever suitable ingredients you have on hand, which is what we often did. We also frequently used venison or a combination of venison with pork."

MY REVIEW
Lcorynmu User ID: 8638548 238168
Reviewed Nov. 26, 2015

"The are not UP Pasties they are Finnish pasties. Pasties came to the UP from Cornwall England that were a staple of the miners lives. Never was the meat ground. That's just for starters,"

MY REVIEW
81chains User ID: 8624854 237614
Reviewed Nov. 18, 2015

"Interesting twist on the traditional. And sorry yourmominem, pasties came from Cornwall, UK."

MY REVIEW
Lisa52270 User ID: 8619395 237463
Reviewed Nov. 16, 2015

"There is No Garlic in the Traditional Pasty or Cream! I've lived in the U.P my whole life,now 45. If you add this you won't have the original.We also don't use Red potatoes,we use Russett,also a lot of pasty makers up here add some carrots"

MY REVIEW
STraye30 User ID: 8557733 233973
Reviewed Oct. 4, 2015

"Great recipe and dough is perfect for Pasties but this makes way too much filing for 12 of them. You could easily cut it in half and have more than enough."

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