Hungarian Goulash Recipe

3 17 12
Hungarian Goulash Recipe
Hungarian Goulash Recipe photo by Taste of Home
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Hungarian Goulash Recipe

Read Reviews
3 17 12
Publisher Photo
Talk about your heirloom recipes! My grandmother made this for my mother when she was a child, and she made it for us to enjoy. Paprika and caraway add wonderful flavor and sour cream gives it a creamy richness. It’s simply scrumptious! —Marcia Doyle, Pompano, Florida
MAKES:
12 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 20 min. Cook: 7 hours
MAKES:
12 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 20 min. Cook: 7 hours

Ingredients

  • 3 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped
  • 2 medium green peppers, chopped
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1-1/2 cups reduced-sodium beef broth
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Dash sugar
  • 12 cups uncooked whole wheat egg noodles
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) reduced-fat sour cream

Directions

Place the onions, carrots and green peppers in a 5-qt. slow cooker. Sprinkle meat with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. In a large skillet, brown meat in oil in batches. Transfer to slow cooker.
Add broth to skillet, stirring to loosen browned bits from pan. Combine the flour, paprika, tomato paste, caraway seeds, garlic, sugar and remaining salt and pepper; stir into skillet. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Pour over meat. Cover and cook on low for 7-9 hours or until meat is tender.
Cook noodles according to package directions. Stir sour cream into slow cooker. Drain noodles; serve with goulash. Yield: 12 servings.
Originally published as Hungarian Goulash in Healthy Cooking October/November 2011, p33

Nutritional Facts

2/3 cup goulash with 1 cup noodles: 388 calories, 13g fat (4g saturated fat), 78mg cholesterol, 285mg sodium, 41g carbohydrate (5g sugars, 7g fiber), 31g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 3 lean meat, 2 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 fat.

  • 3 medium onions, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped
  • 2 medium green peppers, chopped
  • 3 pounds beef stew meat
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1-1/2 cups reduced-sodium beef broth
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Dash sugar
  • 12 cups uncooked whole wheat egg noodles
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) reduced-fat sour cream
  1. Place the onions, carrots and green peppers in a 5-qt. slow cooker. Sprinkle meat with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. In a large skillet, brown meat in oil in batches. Transfer to slow cooker.
  2. Add broth to skillet, stirring to loosen browned bits from pan. Combine the flour, paprika, tomato paste, caraway seeds, garlic, sugar and remaining salt and pepper; stir into skillet. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Pour over meat. Cover and cook on low for 7-9 hours or until meat is tender.
  3. Cook noodles according to package directions. Stir sour cream into slow cooker. Drain noodles; serve with goulash. Yield: 12 servings.
Originally published as Hungarian Goulash in Healthy Cooking October/November 2011, p33

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Reviews forHungarian Goulash

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MY REVIEW
Ash User ID: 9299487 276945
Reviewed Oct. 30, 2017

"People rating this based on name alone need to get off the internet and find something better to do with their time. That's the beauty of crock potting. Start with a base and mix it up to your liking. I rarely see any crock pot recipe that can be truly authentic. This is actually a pretty good recipe with a few modifications. My family requests this on a weekly basis. I like to sub out 1 tbs of paprika for Cajun seasoning to give it more spice and we like to add mushrooms to it. I whisk all my dry ingredients in a bowl prior to adding to the broth. I add the broth, whisk in either paste or ketchup depending on what I have on hand. Once that's blended, I slowly start whisking in the dry ingredients. It makes it much easier to stir without the flour clumping and it thickens up much faster. We also do sour cream in our bowls to personal liking. I think it takes away from the flavor if you mix it in with the rest of the stew."

MY REVIEW
peetzaguy User ID: 725538 274984
Reviewed Oct. 7, 2017

"I don't care to hear a debate over whether this SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT be called goulash or whatever... is the recipe any good??? The author can call it whatever they want for all I care. Rate the recipe, not the name of it."

MY REVIEW
Sally User ID: 9269502 274720
Reviewed Oct. 1, 2017

"I'll give this a neutral rating because I haven't actually tried it yet. This is only somewhat authentic because it is a cross of Russian beef Stroganoff (the pasta part) with Austro-Hungarian Szegedine (or Szekely, depending on language) Goulasch. The latter recipe from Luchow's famous German restaurant in NYC called for 2 lb. veal or beef, 4 tlbs. beef suet, 1 1/2 c. onions, 1 clove garlic,1 tsp. salt, 1/2 tsp. pepper, 1 c. ripe or canned tomatoes, 1 c. sour creme, 2 tsp. paprika, 2 tsp. mulled (chopped) caraway seeds, 1 lb. sauerkraut, & 3 tbls. chopped parsley. It was the favorite of Rachmaninoff, a frequent guest at the Steinway table there. Szekley (AKA Siculi) was an ethnic group that located in Transylvania, in present-day Romania before the Magyars. The last remnants of the Szekely autonomy was suppressed by Austria after the Revolution of 1848. But this is a recipe made with a base of sauerkraut, not pasta, and it is entirely possible that this was an Austrian inclusion of the 19th century. Other comments below that goulashes generally do not have sour creme in them would be otherwise correct. But Szegedine Goulasch was the rare exception."

MY REVIEW
michelea312 User ID: 4504467 274696
Reviewed Sep. 30, 2017

"The recipe was so bland we never even ate the leftovers, it just seemed flavorless to us."

MY REVIEW
cmad60 User ID: 4240897 269852
Reviewed Jul. 23, 2017

"I had a Polish Grandmother, and I live in area of the country where a LARGE portion of my grandparents generation immigrated here directly from Poland/Germany/Hungary, so I DO know that this isn't authentic Goulash, but, rather something closer to beef Paprikash...and, I DON'T CARE! I MIGHT have cared when I was in my 20's, but, in my late 50's I'm just happy to see that something besides Cabbage Rolls has escaped into the general population."

MY REVIEW
Agnes User ID: 9222485 269666
Reviewed Jul. 18, 2017

"Sorry folks, what you (and this recipe is) are talking about is not authentic. Goulash is never made with sour cream or yogurt. It is a soup made with beef and a lots of vegetables (celery root, carrot, onion, garlic and green spices like parsley, celery green, black pepper, etc.) and paprika. After cooking slow for a at least 2-3 hours, you will end up with a very delicious soup, the flavor is reached by the meat, paprika, salt, black pepper, onion, green leaves, carrot and garlic. No other ingredients are needed. No sour cream, no yogurt. Any other recipes are fake. Trust me, I am a Hungarian :-). What you are publishing here is a recipe for chicken paprika, classically chicken drum sticks made with onions, paprika, salt, black pepper and after the meat gets soft, it is stirred with sour cream. Sounds easy, however the recipe is more complex."

MY REVIEW
Til User ID: 9222482 269665
Reviewed Jul. 18, 2017

"Horribly poor example of Goulash... it would make any Hungarian grandmother roll over in her grave. I wouldn't even feed this to my vizsla."

MY REVIEW
dkrupa User ID: 7908923 238041
Reviewed Nov. 24, 2015

"I added diced tomatoes and cayenne pepper, and let the family add their Greek yogurt as they wished instead of blending it in."

MY REVIEW
ettakarl User ID: 877220 226183
Reviewed May. 11, 2015

"This recipe was bland for our taste."

MY REVIEW
sdipiazza User ID: 2106899 193540
Reviewed May. 15, 2014

"Good recipe. I halved the recipe and eliminated the olive oil..I am always trying to cut down on calories. this dish was very tasty without the oil."

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