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My Brazilian Feijoada

A co-worker's mom used to make this dish for him and it was his favorite. So I made him my own version. Instead of sausage you can use ham hocks, or substitute lean white meat for the red meat if you prefer. —Christiane Counts, Webster, Texas
  • Total Time
    Prep: 20 min. + soaking Cook: 7 hours
  • Makes
    10 servings

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces dried black beans (about 1 cup)
  • 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder butt roast, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 bone-in beef short ribs (about 1-1/2 pounds)
  • 4 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled
  • 1-1/4 cups diced onion
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1-1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 8 ounces smoked sausage, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • Orange sections
  • Hot cooked rice, optional

Directions

  • Rinse and sort beans; soak according to package directions. Meanwhile, place pork roast, short ribs and bacon in a 6-qt. slow cooker. Add onion, garlic, bay leaf and seasonings; pour chicken broth, water and beef broth over meat. Cook, covered, on high 2 hours.
  • Stir in beans and sausage. Cook, covered, on low 5-6 hours, until meat and beans are tender. Discard bay leaf. Remove short ribs. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from bones; discard bones. Shred meat with 2 forks; return to slow cooker. Top servings with orange sections. If desired, serve with hot cooked rice.

My Brazilian Feijoada Tips

What does feijoada mean?

 The word “feijao” translates to bean in Portuguese. Feijoada is a versatile stew of beans, various meats and sausages that's typically served over rice. 

What goes with Brazilian feijoada?

In addition to the rice, feijoada is traditionally served with orange slices, which are believed to increase the absorption of iron from the black beans. Feijoada can also be paired with a vinaigrette salad of tomatoes, onions, and bell peppers.  

Where does feijoada come from?

Although it originated in Portugal, feijoada is often called the national dish of Brazil. With beans being a central ingredient, Brazil’s version specifically uses black beans due to its high agricultural cultivation of the crop, although different regions of Brazil also use brown or red beans.
Research contributed by Mark Neufang, Taste of Home Culinary Assistant 
Nutrition Facts
1 serving: 481 calories, 27g fat (11g saturated fat), 123mg cholesterol, 772mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate (2g sugars, 4g fiber), 41g protein.

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Reviews

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  • shawnba
    Jan 30, 2020

    This was an interesting and tasty dinner. The different meats gave it lovely textures and flavors. I did add a some spices (cumin, red pepper flakes) for a little heat, but otherwise, no changes