Dandelion Jelly Recipe

4.5 2 2
Dandelion Jelly Recipe
Dandelion Jelly Recipe photo by Taste of Home
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Dandelion Jelly Recipe

Read Reviews
4.5 2 2
Publisher Photo
I have made this jelly for many years. It has a wonderful honey taste and friends and family are always delighted receive it as a gift.—Donna Bohaty, Rockford, Illinois
MAKES:
48 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 30 min. Process: 5 min.
MAKES:
48 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 30 min. Process: 5 min.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dandelion blossoms
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 package (1-3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin
  • 5-1/2 cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons orange or lemon extract
  • 4 to 6 drops green food coloring, optional

Directions

In a large saucepan, bring dandelion blossoms and water to a boil; boil 4 minutes.
Line a strainer or colander with four layers of cheesecloth or one coffee filter; place over a bowl. Place dandelion mixture in prepared strainer. Strain mixture, reserving 3 cups liquid. Discard blossoms.
In a Dutch oven, combine pectin and reserved dandelion liquid. Bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Stir in sugar; return to a full rolling boil. Boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat; add extract and, if desired, food coloring. Skim off foam. Ladle hot liquid into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot mixture. Wipe rims. Center lids on jars; screw on bands until fingertip tight.
Place jars into canner with simmering water, ensuring that they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil; process for 5 minutes. Remove jars and cool. Yield: about 6 half-pints.
Editor’s Note: Verify that dandelion blossoms haven't been treated with lawn-care chemicals. The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Editor's Note: Verify that flowers are edible and have not been treated with chemicals.
The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Originally published as Dandelion Jelly in Birds & Blooms April/May 1998, p55

Nutritional Facts

2 tablespoons: 97 calories, 0 fat (0 saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 0 sodium, 24g carbohydrate (23g sugars, 0 fiber), 0 protein.

  • 2 cups dandelion blossoms
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 package (1-3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin
  • 5-1/2 cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons orange or lemon extract
  • 4 to 6 drops green food coloring, optional
  1. In a large saucepan, bring dandelion blossoms and water to a boil; boil 4 minutes.
  2. Line a strainer or colander with four layers of cheesecloth or one coffee filter; place over a bowl. Place dandelion mixture in prepared strainer. Strain mixture, reserving 3 cups liquid. Discard blossoms.
  3. In a Dutch oven, combine pectin and reserved dandelion liquid. Bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Stir in sugar; return to a full rolling boil. Boil 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  4. Remove from heat; add extract and, if desired, food coloring. Skim off foam. Ladle hot liquid into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot mixture. Wipe rims. Center lids on jars; screw on bands until fingertip tight.
  5. Place jars into canner with simmering water, ensuring that they are completely covered with water. Bring to a boil; process for 5 minutes. Remove jars and cool. Yield: about 6 half-pints.
Editor’s Note: Verify that dandelion blossoms haven't been treated with lawn-care chemicals. The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Editor's Note: Verify that flowers are edible and have not been treated with chemicals.
The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Originally published as Dandelion Jelly in Birds & Blooms April/May 1998, p55

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Reviews forDandelion Jelly

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MY REVIEW
dublinlab User ID: 1682119 247841
Reviewed May. 3, 2016

"I have made this for a couple of years. I use one each of lemon and orange and no food colouring. Everyone loves this jelly."

MY REVIEW
MamaAnneka User ID: 6647238 21910
Reviewed Apr. 17, 2012

"I liked this recipe, a honey-tasting jelly as the description called it. I made only half and I lessened the amount of orange extract by less than half called for, which turned out well according to my tastes. I did not color the jelly & followed some other instructions: removing most of the green part, so that it wouldn't be bitter and instead of boiling the flowers and water, I poured boiling water over the yellow flower petals and let it sit for 24 hours. A nice way to bridge the gap until some of the more standard jam recipes become seasonal."

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