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Can-Can Chicken

Here's a tasty take on the popular beer-can chicken. Once the bird is on the grill, the work's basically done. And cleanup is a cinch—a must for a guy like me. —Steve Bath, Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Total Time
    Prep: 30 min. + chilling Grill: 1-1/4 hours + standing
  • Makes
    6 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground mustard
  • 1 broiler/fryer chicken (3-1/2 to 4 pounds)
  • 1 can (12 ounces) beer

Directions

  • In a small bowl, mix the first 7 ingredients. With fingers, carefully loosen skin from chicken; rub seasoning mixture under and over skin. Tuck wings under chicken. Refrigerate, covered, 1 hour.
  • Completely cover all sides of an 8- or 9-in. baking pan with foil. Place a beer-can chicken rack securely in pan. Remove half of the beer from can. Using a can opener, make additional large holes in top of can; place can in rack.
  • Stand chicken vertically on rack; place on grill rack. Grill, covered, over indirect medium heat 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 hours or until a thermometer inserted in thickest part of thigh reads 170°-175°.
  • Carefully remove pan from grill; tent chicken with foil. Let stand 15 minutes before carving.
Nutrition Facts
1 serving: 377 calories, 20g fat (5g saturated fat), 122mg cholesterol, 1067mg sodium, 4g carbohydrate (3g sugars, 0 fiber), 39g protein.

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Reviews

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  • Richmeister67
    May 19, 2017

    Google Poultry Pal. It's a pretty cool device for doing your "beer can" chicken. WIth the Poultry Pal you can use other liquids besides beer to flavor the chicken. There's also a cookbook called Zen and the Art of Beer Can Chicken.

  • G.Daniell
    May 18, 2017

    No comment left

  • chsmoak
    May 18, 2016

    Pardon me rebelwithoutaclue, but there is such a thing as a beer can chicken rack. I own 2 and have given several as gifts. It is a vertical rack with a round holder built inside to hold the beer can. Beer can chicken is moist and tasty and I have cooked them on the grill and baked in a conventional oven and this is a wonderful recipe. You can buy the beer can rack for under $5 at Ace Hardware.

  • rebelwithoutaclue
    Jul 7, 2015

    A vertical Roaster does not have a beer can attachement. A VR is much more efficient than a beer [email protected] 25 Aug. '14 The device is called a vertical roaster. There are many on the market. I have a Stanek the last 30 years. Just google. It cuts the cooking time way down and you cook at a very high heat. So moist and juicy with crisp skin. The note said if you spray the skin you have to cook longer? Never found that to be true. When the internal temp hits 162 degrees, it is ready. Just cover with tin foil for about 10 min. Vertical roasters come in sizes that you can use for chicken, turkey and Cornish Game hens. Best invention since air condition.

  • debfar
    Jul 6, 2015

    This was an excellent dinner. The spices were great. Grilled at medium for about 1 1/2 hours. Turned out fantastic. I will definitely make this again and again. Very easy and not much tending too. Excellent dinner and very moist and tender.

  • jcsew
    Aug 25, 2014

    I wan to know where to find the rack?

  • Marjade
    Aug 15, 2014

    very good!!!!!

  • Chili Champ
    Jun 30, 2014

    I have been making this recipe for years. You can usually find the holders at Walmart in their outdoor cooking utensils and grill parts department. I have used a lot of different seasonings over the years but use paprika as my base seasoning, but I also usually spray the chicken with oil before putting it on a grill. This seems to keep the skin a little more moist. I also use a foil pan with sides to catch all of the drippings. I then toss the foil pan during clean-up. (Very easy clean-up) I have nothing but ravings for more when I make my "beer-can chicken"! Hint: I usually try not to prick the skin of the chicken while cooking so that the juices remain in the meat until it's carved for serving.

  • Kitchen_Witch
    Jan 6, 2014

    I have tried this and WOW!

  • Schillicious
    Sep 12, 2013

    Where do you purchase the beer rack?