Brach’s Is Selling Turkey Dinner Candy Corn for Thanksgiving, So We Tasted Every Flavor in the Bag

Brach's Turkey Dinner candy corn has six flavors, one for every classic Thanksgiving dish. I sampled them all.

September is the time of year when all the candy corn haters come out. Well, I might not eat candy corn for breakfast, but I’m sure not throwing it away. It’s a perfectly delightful and colorful Halloween candy, fun to bite off by section and way better tasting than that peanut butter candy wrapped in wax paper. So perhaps I’m the ideal person to try Brach’s Turkey Dinner candy corn, six flavors of candy corn inspired by the dishes on a classic Thanksgiving menu.

Each bag includes cranberry, green bean, stuffing, roast turkey, and for dessert, apple pie and coffee. It reminds me of the infamous 3-Course Dinner Gum, from Willy Wonka, except each candy corn only has one flavor. Thankfully.

What Does the Thanksgiving Candy Corn Taste Like?

This isn’t the tricolored Halloween candy corn you’re used to. This is Thanksgiving candy corn, so you can’t reach in the bag and grab a handful. You’ve got to take them out individually, guess which flavor each one is and eat accordingly. Sadly, there’s no Whitman’s Sampler-style map on the package, but the guide below should help you out.

Cranberry

The cranberry candy corn, red in color, seemed like the safest to start with. “It mostly tastes like candy corn,” says my husband. I agree. If you’d told me it was any red fruit flavor under the sun—strawberry, cherry, raspberry—I’d have believed you. It’s just kind of sweet and sugary, fruity and a tiny bit tart. No problems here.

Green Bean

Green beans were never a part of my family’s Thanksgiving dinner—we had my grandma’s cucumber salad instead—but I know they are a beloved tradition for many. But as a candy? I was braced for the worst, and my husband and daughter completely refused to try this one. To me, this bright green candy corn tasted like—well, did you ever eat grass as a kid? And it’s fresh and not offensive but also like something you should never put in your mouth?

Stuffing

The stuffing-flavored candy corn has an orangish-tan top and a white base. Not to be confused with the roast turkey candy corn, which has a brown top and a yellow base. It doesn’t really matter, because both are… savory. The stuffing flavor tastes like licking a bouillon cube. Stuffing is probably my favorite part of any Thanksgiving meal, but this candy corn harms the good name of that beloved side dish.

Roast Turkey

I was nervous to move on to the roast turkey but I did it for you. I took one nibble and immediately started to doubt myself. It tasted just like stuffing! Had I mixed the two up? Which one was which? Neither of them tasted like a slice of meat, thankfully, but both of them had that gravy-ish, bouillon-y taste. You probably don’t want to use this flavor to make your candy corn turkeys.

Apple Pie

Finally, moving on to the dessert course! Apple pie has a tan top and a white base, and bursts with apple-cinnamon flavor. Whether or not you like this one depends on how much you love apples. I’m meh on them, so I was meh on this, but I know some people will love it. It must be inspired by this Apple Pie and Pumpkin Pie candy corn.

Coffee

The coffee candy corn needed to come last, of course, to wash down the entire meal. It’s dark brown on top, tan on the bottom. And last but not least…the coffee candy corn was by far the best of the six! It’s sweet and mellow and rich, not super-strong with the coffee flavor, but pleasant, and a nice way to finish the taste test.

Where to Buy Turkey Dinner Candy Corn

You can buy Brach’s Turkey Dinner candy corn at Walgreens. If you think a family taste test would be a fun way to pass time while the turkey roasts, I say, go for it. And then before dinner, you can personally give thanks that you didn’t have to eat more than one of the stuffing or roast-turkey flavored candies. Pass the cranberry sauce, please!

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Gael Fashingbauer Cooper
Gael Fashingbauer Cooper is a journalist and pop-culture junkie, and the co-author of "Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops?" and "The Totally Sweet '90s." She's hosted podcasts, won national headline awards, edited travel books and covered television, movies, travel and books for NBC News Digital, as well as tech and pop culture news for CNET.com, food news for The Daily Meal, and business news for Inc. and Money Talks News. She is a weblog pioneer who began blogging in 1999. Her specialties include generational analysis and retro and pop-culture news.