The 8 Best Potato Storage Bins and Containers of 2024

Updated: Mar. 20, 2024

The right potato storage container is both stylish and functional. These top-rated options keep spuds fresh for months.

Our editors and experts handpick every product we feature. We may earn a commission from your purchases.
Learn more.

The 8 Best Potato Storage Bins And Containers Of 2024 Ft Via Amazon.comVIA MERCHANT

Whether made into fries, mashed, baked or stewed, potatoes are arguably one of the best superfoods. Not only do they taste amazing, but they’re also rich with antioxidant vitamin C, along with potassium. However you like to enjoy your potatoes, having a proper potato storage container is key to keeping these meal starters fresh, starchy and oh-so-yummy.

“In addition to being delicious, part of the reason potatoes are America’s favorite vegetable is their affordability and long shelf life, which proper storage helps safely maximize,” says Bonnie Johnson, registered dietitian and the Director of Nutrition for Potatoes USA. “If you prefer to store your potatoes in a container, look for one with holes so the potatoes can breathe. Properly stored potatoes will last longer and taste better!”

While a burlap bag or simple bowl work fine, they certainly don’t look very nice sitting on the counter. No matter what your kitchen aesthetic is, we rounded up all the best potato storage containers that look cute and work a treat at keeping these valuable ingredients free from green spots and sprouts.

1 / 8
The Pioneer Woman Potato Storage Container Ecomm Via Walmart.com
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

The Pioneer Woman Potato Storage Container

Investing in a high-quality potato storage container is a kitchen storage idea that keeps food fresher for longer. This 9.5-inch Pioneer Woman potato keeper is a beautiful piece of blue tone stoneware with eye-catching floral accents, making it the prettiest potato storage container on our list. It’s equipped with three round holes to promote proper airflow while keeping potatoes cool and dry. It not only adds a splash of happiness to your kitchen countertop or shelf, but it also pairs perfectly with other Pioneer Woman decor. There’s even a matching onion storage container!

2 / 8
Potato Storage Box Ecomm Via Wayfair.com
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Gracie Oaks Potato Storage Box

This potato storage container offers timeless appeal and ventilation holes on each side to keep potatoes fresh for months. It’s 12 inches tall, allowing enough room for several varieties of potatoes while keeping them free from dust thanks to the box’s lid. It’s one of the best home organizing finds at Wayfair and an excellent value for the price considering how many potatoes it stores. Need more storage solutions? Learn about an avocado keeper, how to organize spices and our favorite wine racks.

3 / 8
Potato Basket
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

The classic potato sack gets a modern upgrade with these burlap potato and onion baskets with handles. They’re ideal for anyone who needs extra storage space for upwards of 10 pounds of potatoes or up to five pounds of onions. They add functional style to any walk-in pantry or basement. Pair it with the best produce keepers on Amazon so everything in your kitchen stays fresh long after your grocery trip.

4 / 8
Ventilated Potato Storage Containers Ecomm Via Amazon.com
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Ventilated Potato Storage Containers

These vintage-like potato storage containers are so cute you’ll want to display them on your counters. They’re one of the kitchen products that reduce food waste, thanks to their high-end sheet steel with ventilation holes that delay sprouting, molding or spoiling. Proper ventilation is one of the most important considerations when you’re learning how to store potatoes the right way. Plus, this set features staggered sizes with labels for storing potatoes and onions—it even features a garlic keeper!

“I love these!” writes verified Amazon reviewer, Samantha Dawn Hoover. “They hold a lot more than I had originally thought they would. Now my cabinets don’t have the onion and garlic debris and it keeps it all organized. They are also super cute and I love that they’re sturdy so I don’t have to worry about them cracking or breaking. This makes all my organization dreams come true!”

5 / 8
Stackable Wire Baskets
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Stackable Wire Baskets

If you’re only storing a few pounds of potatoes at a time, these stylish wire baskets are for you. They’re a smart pantry storage container for organizing dry produce like potatoes and onions, as well as fruits and veggies that don’t require refrigeration. Unlike bulky wire baskets, this is a compact pantry organization bin that comfortably sits on a shelf.

6 / 8
Two Tier Bamboo Baskets
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Two-Tier Bamboo Baskets

These bamboo baskets make a stylish potato storage container and are compact enough to neatly tuck away in a pantry or lower kitchen island cart. They’re made of renewable, eco-friendly bamboo that looks and feels like wood while standing up to moisture and humidity even better. The two-tiered system is also easy to clean—just wipe it clean with a damp cloth. Pro tip: Label each level with these cute TikTok pantry labels.

“Excellent space-saving organizer for the pantry,” adds Mark T., a verified Amazon purchaser. “The construction is lightweight but sturdy enough to handle items like potatoes or onions.”

7 / 8
Two Tier Standing Basket Organizer Ecomm Via Amazon.com
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Two-Tier Standing Basket Organizer

This steel storage basket tower is a sturdy kitchen countertop organizer for storing several pounds of potatoes and dry goods. It features BPA-free, food-safe powder coating that stands up to rigorous use and washing. The rubbed bronze color is a trendy complement to most modern kitchen aesthetics. As one of Amazon’s best-rated kitchen storage solutions, this pick certainly holds up.

Verified Amazon purchaser Roddie B. writes, “Each basket can easily hold five pounds of potatoes, with plenty of room to spare. It’s not too wide, so it fits easily in my kitchen. It has a solid footing, even when I had to move it when it was full, it was solid with no threat of tipping over.”

8 / 8
Potato Bags Ecomm Via Walmart.com
VIA MERCHANT VIA MERCHANT

Potato Bags

You can’t go wrong with these sprout-free potato bags. A black inner lining keeps light out to maintain optimal spud freshness for weeks longer. When the cotton bags need a refresh, simply pop them in the washing machine to make them good as new.


FAQ

What is the best way to store potatoes at home?

“You should keep potatoes in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place like a pantry or cabinet,” says Bonnie. “Avoid high temperatures such as next to appliances or under the sink, and keep potatoes away from too much direct sunlight (i.e., no countertops). Also, make sure you wait to wash your potatoes until you’re ready to cook them, as dampness will lead to early spoilage.”

Do potatoes last longer in the fridge or on the counter?

According to Bonnie, you shouldn’t refrigerate or freeze fresh potatoes before cooking. She notes that colder temperatures lower than 50°F will cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooking.

“The best place to store fresh potatoes is neither the fridge nor the counter, but rather a cool, dark, well-ventilated place like a pantry or cabinet,” she says. “For folks looking for help with meal prep or leftovers, fully cooked potatoes do freeze well!”

Are green potatoes safe to eat?

Potatoes turn green when they’re exposed to light, which speeds up their production of chlorophyll. Solanine production also increases when chlorophyll production ramps up, which can lead to digestive issues and other health problems if consumed in large quantities.

“You can still eat safely eat a potato with slight greening, but we recommend cutting away the green portions of the skin before cooking and eating, as it can cause a bitter taste,” says Bonnie. “By the way, you can also eat potatoes that have sprouted. Just make sure to cut the sprouts away before cooking or eating the potato.”