Violet Jelly Recipe
Violet Jelly Recipe photo by Taste of Home
Publisher Photo
Publisher Photo
For a beautiful jelly to give as gifts, I make this jelly. Not only is it delicious but it will impress all!— Bernard Bellin, Franklin, Wisconsin
Featured In: Food Gifts for Mom
MAKES:
40 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 40 min. + standing Process: 5 min.
MAKES:
40 servings
TOTAL TIME:
Prep: 40 min. + standing Process: 5 min.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups fresh violet blossoms
  • 3-1/2 cups boiling water
  • 1 package (1-3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 4 cups sugar

Directions

Rinse and drain blossoms; place in a large heat-resistant glass bowl. Pour boiling water over the blossoms and let stand for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
Strain and reserve violet liquid, pressing with a spatula to extract all possible color. Discard blossoms.
Measure violet liquid; add enough water to measure 3-1/2 cups (liquid will be blue-green). Stir in pectin, lemon juice and sugar (the liquid will turn a violet color).
Pour into a large stainless steel saucepan; bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil 1 minute.
Remove from the heat; skim off foam. Carefully ladle hot liquid into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles; wipe rims and adjust lids. Process for 5 minutes in a boiling-water canner. Yield: about 5 half-pints.
Editor's Note: Only pick flowers from chemical-free woods or lawns. Also, be sure your blossoms come from the common wild violet, not the African violet houseplant, which is inedible. The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Originally published as Violet Jelly in Birds & Blooms April/May 1997, p55

Nutritional Facts

2 tablespoons: 86 calories, 0 fat (0 saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 1mg sodium, 22g carbohydrate (21g sugars, 0 fiber), 0 protein.

  • 8 cups fresh violet blossoms
  • 3-1/2 cups boiling water
  • 1 package (1-3/4 ounces) powdered fruit pectin
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 4 cups sugar
  1. Rinse and drain blossoms; place in a large heat-resistant glass bowl. Pour boiling water over the blossoms and let stand for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  2. Strain and reserve violet liquid, pressing with a spatula to extract all possible color. Discard blossoms.
  3. Measure violet liquid; add enough water to measure 3-1/2 cups (liquid will be blue-green). Stir in pectin, lemon juice and sugar (the liquid will turn a violet color).
  4. Pour into a large stainless steel saucepan; bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil 1 minute.
  5. Remove from the heat; skim off foam. Carefully ladle hot liquid into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-in. headspace. Remove air bubbles; wipe rims and adjust lids. Process for 5 minutes in a boiling-water canner. Yield: about 5 half-pints.
Editor's Note: Only pick flowers from chemical-free woods or lawns. Also, be sure your blossoms come from the common wild violet, not the African violet houseplant, which is inedible. The processing time listed is for altitudes of 1,000 feet or less. Add 1 minute to the processing time for each 1,000 feet of additional altitude.
Originally published as Violet Jelly in Birds & Blooms April/May 1997, p55

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ChevalDeLis User ID: 4388194 72995
Reviewed May. 1, 2013

"What an unusual recipe, but quite tasty! It's a very delicate flavor; I put it on cornbread with a touch of butter. The color is superb, especially contrasted with the yellow of the butter/cornbread. It tastes like standing in the middle of a field of clover on a warm day...a bit grassy and not over sweet! Will be perfect to open up a jar next January and be transported right into spring."

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