How to Make Gravy

How to Make Gravy

Step 1
After pouring drippings in a measuring cup or fat separator, skim the fat, reserving 2 tablespoons. Add enough broth to drippings to measure 2 cups.


How to Make Gravy

Step 2
Combine flour and reserved fat in a saucepan until smooth over medium heat.


How to Make Gravy

Step 3
Gradually stir in the drippings mixture. Bring to a boil and stir until thickened. Add seasonings to taste.





Good Turkey Gravy

Making perfect gravy for this Turkey Cutlets with Pan Gravy recipe is a cinch with these tips!


Step 1
To avoid lumpy gravy, first make a roux (pronounced "roo"), which is a mixture of flour and fat (in this case, butter), that's cooked over low heat and used to thicken sauces. A roux can be white, blond or brown, depending on how long it's allowed to cook and what fat the flour is mixed with.


Step 2
Make sure the butter is completely melted before adding the flour. Test it by sprinkling in a pinch of flour. If it slowly starts to bubble, whisk in the rest of the flour. Whisk the butter and flour constantly until the mixture is blended and smooth.


Step 3
Gradually whisk or stir in the chicken broth. Bring the mixture to a boil, whisking constantly until the gravy is thickened, about 2 minutes.




Making Pan Gravy

Use this Pan Gravy recipe to make gravy from meats and poultry roasted in an uncovered roasting pan.


Step 1
Pour pan drippings into a heat-resistant measuring cup. Loosen the browned bits from the roasting pan and add to drippings. Skim fat.


Step 2
Reserve 1/4 cup fat and transfer to a saucepan; whisk in flour until smooth.


Step 3
Add enough broth or water to the pan drippings to measure 2 cups. Gradually stir into flour mixture in saucepan. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until mixture comes to a boil. Cook and stir 2 minutes longer or until thickened. Season with salt, pepper and browning sauce if desired.




The Basics


Reducing Pan Juices for Gravy
To thicken pan juices without flour, remove the meat to a warm serving platter. Transfer pan juices along with browned bits to a saucepan. Bring to a boil; cook, uncovered, until the liquid evaporates enough that it thickens to a gravy consistency.


Making Poultry Gravy
I add chicken bouillon cubes to water and turkey drippings. After I add the flour and the mixture starts to thicken, I stir in evaporated milk for a rich, flavorful gravy.
—Kathy A., Hewitt, Texas


Reducing Pan Juices for Gravy
To thicken pan juices without flour, remove the meat to a warm serving platter. Transfer pan juices along with browned bits to a saucepan. Bring to a boil; cook, uncovered, until the liquid evaporates enough that it thickens to a gravy consistency.


Reducing Fat in Gravy
Here's how I dramatically reduce the amount of fat in my gravy from roasted meat. I boil off most of the liquid until all that's left are the brown caramelized juices on the bottom of the pan and the fat. After pouring off the fat, I add water, loosen the browned bits, add seasonings and thicken. I've made wonderful gravy this way for more than 45 years.
—Nell B., Stoutsville, Missouri


Lightening Up Gravy
To make a lighter gravy, brown flour in a skillet. Cool slightly, then add some instant chicken, beef or vegetable bouillon granules and warm water. Cook and stir until thickened, then add salt and pepper if necessary.
—Elva G., Detroit, Michigan


Quick Gravy
To make a quick gravy, mix 3 tablespoons of cornstarch with a can of evaporated milk and a can of chicken broth; bring the mixture to a boil to thicken it.
—Fran Magill, Geneva, New York



Flavor Tips


Boost Gravy's Color and Flavor
Add a few granules of instant coffee to gravy that's bland and pale. You can't taste the coffee, but it gives the look and flavor a real boost.
—Maryellen M., Searcy, Arkansas


Extra-Delicious Turkey Gravy
For extra-rich and delicious turkey gravy, I stir sour cream into the turkey drippings.
—Maija N., Sonoma, California


Souper Gravy
Instead of flour, I mix a can of cream of mushroom soup with pan drippings and a little water when I make gravy for veal or pork roast. I get compliments every time I make it this way.
—Carole Gillespie, Stony Mountain, Manitoba


Sweet Gravy
To make great gravy, stir in a small amount of sugar. It makes it more robust, not sweet.
—Sondra D., Collinsville, Oklahoma


For Dark, Savory Gravy
My dad was a great cook. His secret to dark savory gravy was coffee. He poured a cup of brewed coffee around a roast or turkey as he was putting it in the oven. We had the best dark gravy every time.
—Susan G., Lake Hiawatha, New Jersey


Add Flavor to Stew and Gravy
To give gravy and stew great color and flavor, add a few teaspoons of soy sauce.
—Denise J., Hines Creek, Alberta


Making Great Gravy
Mother cooked in a restaurant and taught me to drop a spoonful of ketchup into beef gravy for richer flavor without a tomato taste.
—Elnora W., Ontario, California



Finishing Touch


No More Lumpy Gravy!
My gravy was always lumpy until I learned a quick trick: Spin lumpy gravy in the blender for a couple seconds until it's smooth and ready to serve.
—Maria B., Satanta, Kansas




Gravy Videos


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